Searching over 5,500,000 cases.


searching
Buy This Entire Record For $7.95

Download the entire decision to receive the complete text, official citation,
docket number, dissents and concurrences, and footnotes for this case.

Learn more about what you receive with purchase of this case.

Rogers v. Social Security Administration

United States District Court, E.D. Arkansas, Jonesboro Division

April 16, 2018

MICHELLE ROGERS PLAINTIFF
v.
SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION DEFENDANT

          ORDER

         I. Introduction:

         Plaintiff, Michelle Rogers, applied for disability benefits on July 24, 2014, alleging a disability onset date of June 30, 2009. (Tr. at 15). That application was denied at the initial and reconsideration levels. Id. After conducting a hearing, the Administrative Law Judge denied Rogers's claim. (Tr. at 26). The Appeals Council denied Rogers's request for review. (Tr. at 1). The ALJ's decision now stands as the final decision of the Commissioner, and Rogers has requested judicial review.

         For the reasons stated below, the Court[1] affirms the decision of the Commissioner.

         II. The Commissioner=s Decision:

         The ALJ found that Rogers had not engaged in substantial gainful activity since the alleged onset date of June 30, 2009. (Tr. at 17). At Step Two of the sequential five-step analysis, the ALJ found that Rogers has the following severe impairments: diabetes mellitus, obesity, status post left leg injury, major depression, and anxiety. Id.

         At Step Three, the ALJ determined that Rogers's impairments did not meet or equal a listed impairment. (Tr. at 18). Before proceeding to Step Four, the ALJ determined that Rogers had the residual functional capacity (“RFC”) to perform the full range of work at the light level, except that: (1) she cannot frequently bend, crouch, or climb; (2) she can only perform work where interpersonal contact is incidental to the work performed, the complexity of tasks is learned and performed by rote, involves few variables, requires little independent judgment, and the supervision required is simple, direct, and concrete; (3) and she cannot deal with the general public. (Tr. at 21)

         The ALJ next determined that Rogers had no past relevant work. (Tr. at 24). Relying upon the testimony of a Vocational Expert (“VE”), the ALJ found that, based on Rogers's age, education, work experience and RFC, there are jobs that exist in significant numbers in the national economy that she can perform, specifically stamper and cleaner/polisher. (Tr. at 25). Therefore, the ALJ found that Rogers was not disabled. (Tr. at 26).

         III. Discussion:

         A.

         Standard of Review The Court's role is to determine whether the Commissioner's findings are supported by substantial evidence. Prosch v. Apfel, 201 F.3d 1010, 1012 (8th Cir. 2000). “Substantial evidence” in this context means less than a preponderance but more than a scintilla. Slusser v. Astrue, 557 F.3d 923, 925 (8th Cir. 2009). In other words, it is “enough that a reasonable mind would find it adequate to support the ALJ's decision.” Id. (citation omitted). The Court must consider not only evidence that supports the Commissioner's decision, but also evidence that supports a contrary outcome. The Court cannot reverse the decision, however, “merely because substantial evidence exists for the opposite decision.” Long v. Chater, 108 F.3d 185, 187 (8th Cir. 1997) (quoting Johnson v. Chater, 87 F.3d 1015, 1017 (8th Cir. 1996)).

         B.

         Rogers's Arguments on Appeal Rogers contends that substantial evidence does not support the ALJ's decision to deny benefits. She argues that the ALJ failed to fully develop the record and that the RFC for light work exceeded her physical capabilities. For the following reasons, the Court finds that substantial evidence supports the ALJ's decision.

         First, it is clear that Rogers has dealt with some mental health problems for some time. She reported auditory hallucinations and panic attacks in September 2008 during a five-day inpatient stay at Mid-South Health Systems. (Tr. at 844-845). Discharge diagnosis was chronic PTSD and anxiety disorder. Id.

         Rogers was admitted to St. Bernard's Hospital for attempted suicide on September 5, 2008. (Tr. at 520-534, 640-648). She was placed on suicide precautions. Id. She was discharged three days later with prescriptions for Clonazepam, Effexor, Trazadone, and Abilify. Id. She was urged to follow up with mental health treatment. There is no record that she did so, and on September 28, 2009, Rogers was admitted to Pemiscot Memorial Hospital for major depressive disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, poly-substance ...


Buy This Entire Record For $7.95

Download the entire decision to receive the complete text, official citation,
docket number, dissents and concurrences, and footnotes for this case.

Learn more about what you receive with purchase of this case.